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798 THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL JOURNAL [June 

Superintendent Wagner has brought together in a very readable volume' 
the accumulated results and conclusions of years of experience in the exercise 
of supervisory functions. His treatment of some of these problems is both 
interesting and practical. 

As the basis of supervision he holds that "the advancement of the pupil 
is the simple end aimed at by teacher and supervisor" (p. 8). In order that 
desirable sequence, completeness of instruction, and imity of purpose may 
prevail, supervision must pass out of the realm of personaUties and opinions 
"into the higher region of detachment and impersonality, and [be] main- 
tained on the level of purely professional work, conducted in the atmosphere 
of judicial procedure" (p. 18). The three marks of adequate supervision are 
"commendation of the good, condemnation of the imsatisfactory, suggestion 
of the better" (p. 39). 

Around these main precepts he weaves his arguments for a more sensible 
use and understanding of the supervisory capacities. Especially significant 
are his chapters dealing with the problem of developing the right attitude 
toward supervision on the part of teachers, with the rating of teachers as 
a part of the supervisory functions, the means of securing harmonious co- 
operation among the entire force of teachers, and his suggestions as to the 
most effective kind of supervision. Indeed, one may paraphrase his title and 
describe the book as imcommonly sensible. He is not dogmatic or pedantic, 
but states in forcefid language the convictions he holds as to what his experi- 
ence has taught him. 

The teacher in the grades, as well as the principal or the young superin- 
tendent, woidd profit by a careful study of the book. Much is admitted as 
imsettled; much is stated as largely makeshift, but a sound educational 
philosophy permeates the book. It will help to meet a genuine need. 



A spelling dictionary. — Children frequently fail to cultivate the dictionary 
habit as an aid to spelling because of the fact that the ordinary dictionary is 
somewhat inconvenient for that purpose. The dictionary contains so many 
words that are beyond the child's vocabulary and also so much material not 
directly related to spelling that the child refuses to take the necessary time 
for locating the desired word. In order to provide a means whereby children 
may easily and quickly look up the spelling of words, a special spelling dic- 
tionary' has been prepared by Coryell and Holmes. 

The vocabulary of the book has been carefuUy selected and arranged. 
In all it contains about 9,000 words arranged in two parallel lists. One list, 
containing 3,600 words, includes 90 per cent of all words used in children's 

" Charles A. Wagner, Common Sense in School Supervision. Milwaukee: 
Bruce Publishing Co., 1921. Pp. 201. 

' HtJBERT V. Coryell and Henry W. Holmes, Word Finder. Yonkers-on- 
Hudson, New York: World Book Co., 1921. Pp. viii+iso. $0.72.